Suddenly jazz became a major taboo in Soviet society until Stalin’s death. In Western Europe, by contrast, mainly in Paris, jazz took off after the Nazis’ defeat in the hues of Miles Davis and Dave Brubeck. These postwar musicians reimagined the red-hot extemporaneous rhythms of the bebop movement for the more relaxed, pastel-like style of what’s been called “cool jazz.” They counteracted the wild exuberance of the war years with musical nonchalance. It’s not by chance that in 1957, Davis released his acclaimed album Birth of the Cool. This is the sort of music that Pawlikowski uses in Cold War to introduce us to 1950s Paris. Laid-back, suave, cymbal snare tails – one hears hints of “Take Five.” A map collector, a filmmaker, an amateur ornithologist – Peter Greenaway, in his short film A Walk through H (1978), leads viewers on a colorful bird-watching tour across make-believe lands by way of maps, ninety-two of them. Nearly every shot of the film is a static image of mapped territory overlaid by routes denoting the flight patterns of various species of birds. Sometimes Greenaway’s maps themselves even look like birds. This experiment in avian cartography challenges viewers to re...