Problems You Should Be Aware of When Using Any RGB LED Lights

They say RGB lights will make you get rid of old-fashioned color gels. This article shows exactly the opposite. You should keep your gels and even buy more. The video shows a comparison between different brands of lights including HMIs, halogen, daylight-balanced LEDs, tungsten-balanced LEDs, and RGB LEDs. All tested RGB LED lights are of high quality. Tim Kang from Quasar and Ted from Indy Mogul show us a test where they film subjects of known color under different lighting situations. The results are reviewed on a monitor to see if these objects are correctly represented. As you know, the HMIs and halogen lights give a fairly correct representation of natural colors when the footage is color corrected. This is what their tests proved as well. The next set of experiments were with white and tungsten-balanced LEDs opposed to LEDs with a programed “white,” where the color “white” is composed out of red, green, and blue LEDs, not by a single white or tungsten-balanced light emitting diode. The results are quite shocking: the combination of red, green, and blue do not represent the natural color spectrum for colors we know and see. After you watch the video,...

Once you are sure your ceiling is properly prepared for painting, and your tools are washed

Once you are sure your ceiling is properly prepared for painting, and your tools are washed and ready for use, begin by stirring the paint with a paint stirrer or a clean offcut of wood. Assemble a step ladder and put on your safety goggles. Then, transfer some of the paint into a paint kettle to avoid carrying the heavy tin up the ladder. Start by painting a 50-70mm thick strip around the edges of the ceiling with a medium sized paint brush; this process is called ‘cutting in’. Pour some of the paint into the paint tray and load the roller but be sure not to overload it as this will stop the roller from rolling smoothly. To avoid visible lines where the paint has dried at different times, start by focusing on the area that you have just ‘cut into’ and blend wet paint with wet paint. Roll with a mixture of up, down and W movements and continue until you have covered the entire ceiling. Once you have completed your first coat, follow the manufacturer’s instruction for drying time and then repeat the process for the second coat. Use masking tape to cover any fittings and woodwork that you are not planning to paint. It’s best to leave an overhang where possible to also protect fro...

What Are Shallots? Nutrition, Benefits, and Substitutes

Shallots are a small, elongated type of onion with a taste that’s often described as a subtle mix between a traditional onion and garlic. They grow in clusters, contain less water, and have thinner peels than traditional onions but can make your eyes water just the same. Still, you may wonder how these onions differ from other varieties and how to best use them in cooking. This article reviews the benefits and uses of shallots, as well as how to substitute for shallots in recipes. Shallots (Allium ascalonicum L.) belong to the Allium family, alongside leeks, chives, scallions, garlic, and other onion varieties, like Vidalia, white, yellow, and sweet onions. Though they appear similar to red onions on the outside, they look very different on the inside. When you peel a shallot, you find that they have 3–6 cloves or bulbs — like garlic — instead of rings like other onions (1). Nutritionally, they have quite a bit to offer, with 3.5 ounces (100 grams or about 10 tablespoons) of chopped shallots providing (2): Compared with common onions, shallots are a more concentrated source of protein, fiber, and micronutrients, including calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, c...

100-year-old abandoned pleasure park hidden in Cornish woods

The unusual attraction was originally inspired by one of the world’s oldest and most popular amusement parks Hidden deep in the woods next to a picturesque Cornish river, lies the overgrown ruins of a 100-year-old pleasure garden, inspired by one of the world’s oldest and most popular amusement parks. The abandoned fountains, arches, bandstand and swimming pool, appearing unexpectedly through the trees and undergrowth beside a woodland path in the village of Lerryn, were once attractions within the long forgotten Tivoli Park, named after the world famous Tivoli Gardens amusement park in Copenhagen. Created by China Clay magnate, Frank Parkyn, who was born in the village in 1850, work began on the elaborate park around 1920, following his visit to the Danish Tivoli. Inspired by the fountains, the octagonal Glass Hall, as well as the arches at the entrance and on the Nimb Hotel of Tivoli Gardens in Copenhagen, Parkyn cleared a large area of his woodland and built ornate structures and water features – including an octagonal pool – within the space. In 1922, Cornwall’s Tivoli Park was opened to the public, and provided a new venue for the increasingly popular Lerr...

Navajo leaders say they weren’t informed about coal deal

COAL: Navajo leaders say they were never informed about Navajo Transitional Energy Company’s purchase of Cloud Peak’s Wyoming coal mines, and it “cannot and should not be supported.” (Navajo Times) ALSO:• Some analysts and members of the Navajo Nation are skeptical of a new study deeming the Cloud Peak deal a “prudent” decision. (Billings Gazette)• The employee attrition rate at a New Mexico coal plant is rising in advance of a planned 2022 closure; the owner says it may need to contract with outside sources for some operations if the trend continues. (Farmington Daily Times) ***SPONSORED LINK: Attend Infocast’s Western Energy Week, October 22-24 in Scottsdale, Arizona for your chance to access both Transmission Summit West and Mountain West Renewable Energy Summit panels, presentations and networking sessions in one place, with one registration. Don’t miss this remarkable opportunity!*** OVERSIGHT: California Governor Gavin Newsom stuns environmental advocates by vetoing a bill that would have made it easier for state regulators to counter the Trump administration’s rollback of clean air and endangered species regulations. (Associated Press) UTILITIES:• New photographic evidenc...

The other day, we talked up the things that annoy us about the cars we own;

The other day, we talked up the things that annoy us about the cars we own; today, we delve into minor annoyances seen only in a few fleeting seconds. The model you don’t own, but are forced to live with on the roadway. Perhaps you’ve never even driven one. While those other drivers may have a laundry list of gripes with their vehicle, it’s likely of no concern to you. You didn’t drop money on it. You’re just observing from afar — and not liking what you see.  Specifically, we’re talking styling gripes. Everyone’s a critic, and automotive design teams have provided each of us with a buffet of decisions worthy of criticism. It doesn’t have to be big — just something that annoys you each and every time you see the offending car. For the record, this writer takes no issue with the styling of Ford’s Ranger pickup. It’s quite attractive. No, in this case, a new addition to the crossover landscape is a prime candidate for scorn: the BMW X2. A number of drivers in the snooty neighborhood to the north have decided this subcompact CUV is just the thing to advertise their inclusion in the six-figure club. In addition to the usual propeller badges adorning the front fascia, liftgate, ...

Hackers Are Stealing Keyless Entry Cars with a $200 Device

Hot Topics: How to Fix Bluetooth Problems | Browse the Web Anonymously | Complete Guide to Facebook Privacy | How to Block Spam Calls by Chelsey B. Coombs on March 22, 2016in Travel & Entertainment, News, Computers and Software, Blog, Privacy :: 3 comments Wireless key entry has made getting into the car much easier and safer than it used to be. As long as the key is somewhere on your person, the door will just open. Some thieves are using exploiting this technology with a $225 tool that lets them open the doors and start the car without having a key fob, according to the German automobile club ADAC. Wireless car entry is dependent on radio communication between the key fob and the car itself. When the key is close enough, it sends a message to the car’s entry system, signaling someone is ready to unlock the doors or start the engine. The car entry system sends a signal back to the key fob, and if the fob is reached, the two work in concert to perform their duties. The ADAC researchers used that same principle to get into the cars without having to place the fob physically close to the car. They built one radio and placed it by the victim’s car, and placed another in the ra...